September 19, 2014 / 1:31AM 331 notes

minimalistco:

Emma Watson by Michael Thompson

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September 19, 2014 / 1:29AM 877 notes


The person I considered the most talented actor in my class was Marilyn Monroe. She would walk into class with Arthur Miller’s shirts tied at her waist, her feet in flip-flops, the sweet musky smell of Lifebuoy soap wafting after her. Her hair pulled back with a rubber band, was always a little wet, as if she’d just stepped out of the shower. One afternoon I was sitting in my place on the Lower East Side when my phone rang. I picked it up, and a voice said, “Hi Lou, It’s Marilyn.” “Marilyn who?” I asked, and when she answered, “Marilyn from class.” I had a genuine fit. She was asking me to be in her love scene in Tennessee William’s The Rose Tattoo at our next class. She was probably being nice to me because I wasn’t one of the stellar students in class, like Sidney Poitier, and no one else was asking me to do love scenes. But here she was, inviting me to play the sailor to her hot-blooded Serafina delle Rose.I was a kid then, full of juice. I considered myself hot to trot, but I knew there was no way on earth I could play that scene. I was so star-struck, I wouldn’t have gotten out one word onstage. I must have stammered or something, because she got off the line pretty fast, and I think it was Marty Landau who ended up playing the scene. (I happen to think Mr. Landau is one of the most consummate actors I have ever seen on stage or screen.) To this day, if I catch a whiff of Lifebuoy soap, my olfactory senses take over and I am undeniably aroused. -Louis Gossett Jr. “An Actor and a Gentleman” 

The person I considered the most talented actor in my class was Marilyn Monroe. She would walk into class with Arthur Miller’s shirts tied at her waist, her feet in flip-flops, the sweet musky smell of Lifebuoy soap wafting after her. Her hair pulled back with a rubber band, was always a little wet, as if she’d just stepped out of the shower. 

One afternoon I was sitting in my place on the Lower East Side when my phone rang. I picked it up, and a voice said, “Hi Lou, It’s Marilyn.” “Marilyn who?” I asked, and when she answered, “Marilyn from class.” I had a genuine fit. She was asking me to be in her love scene in Tennessee William’s The Rose Tattoo at our next class. She was probably being nice to me because I wasn’t one of the stellar students in class, like Sidney Poitier, and no one else was asking me to do love scenes. But here she was, inviting me to play the sailor to her hot-blooded Serafina delle Rose.

I was a kid then, full of juice. I considered myself hot to trot, but I knew there was no way on earth I could play that scene. I was so star-struck, I wouldn’t have gotten out one word onstage. I must have stammered or something, because she got off the line pretty fast, and I think it was Marty Landau who ended up playing the scene. (I happen to think Mr. Landau is one of the most consummate actors I have ever seen on stage or screen.) To this day, if I catch a whiff of Lifebuoy soap, my olfactory senses take over and I am undeniably aroused. 

-Louis Gossett Jr. “An Actor and a Gentleman” 

(Source: mostlymarilynmonroe)

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September 19, 2014 / 1:26AM 990 notes


Marilyn Monroe at The Actor’s Studio photographed by Roy Schatt, 1955.

Marilyn Monroe at The Actor’s Studio photographed by Roy Schatt, 1955.

(Source: ourmarilynmonroe, via jacquesdemys)

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September 17, 2014 / 1:15AM 3,402 notes

ohrobbybaby:

Don’t just stand there, let’s get to it

Strike a pose, there’s nothing to it

Vogue - Madonna (part 1/2)

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September 17, 2014 / 1:15AM 3,064 notes

ohrobbybaby:

Ladies with an attitude

Fellows that were in the mood

Vogue - Madonna (part 1/2)

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September 16, 2014 / 9:02PM 430,435 notes

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September 15, 2014 / 5:06PM 239,164 notes

“I’ll never forget the day Marilyn and I were walking around New York City, just having a stroll on a nice day. She loved New York because no one bothered her there like they did in Hollywood, she could put on her plain-jane clothes and no one would notice her. She loved that. So as we we’re walking down Broadway, she turns to me and says ‘Do you want to see me become her?’ I didn’t know what she meant but I just said ‘Yes’- and then I saw it. I don’t know how to explain what she did because it was so very subtle, but she turned something on within herself that was almost like magic. And suddenly cars were slowing and people were turning their heads and stopping to stare. They were recognizing that this was Marilyn Monroe as if she pulled off a mask or something, even though a second ago nobody noticed her. I had never seen anything like it before.” - Amy Greene, wife of Marilyn’s personal photographer Milton Greene

(via classic-world-1950s)

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September 15, 2014 / 4:58PM 397 notes

historicaltimes:

Walt Disney and Salvador Dali, photographed during the production of the short cartoon “Destino” in 1945-46. The project was abandoned for financial reasons, eventually to be revived by Disney Studios France and released in 2003.

historicaltimes:

Walt Disney and Salvador Dali, photographed during the production of the short cartoon “Destino” in 1945-46. The project was abandoned for financial reasons, eventually to be revived by Disney Studios France and released in 2003.

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September 14, 2014 / 11:54PM 54,917 notes

(Source: jessehimself, via newyorkshows)

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September 14, 2014 / 9:26PM

No sabía que Barney Stinson había estudiado en Casa del Teatro.

No sabía que Barney Stinson había estudiado en Casa del Teatro.

himymneil patrick harrisbarney stinsonhippie

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