October 19, 2014 / 10:41PM 1,469 notes

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October 19, 2014 / 1:22AM 625 notes

theniftyfifties:

James Dean, 1955.

rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

theniftyfifties:

James Dean, 1955.

rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

(Source: pinterest.com, via shimmeringstarlets)

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October 19, 2014 / 12:04AM 181 notes


Vogue US November 2014

Vogue US November 2014

(Source: vogueanon)

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October 18, 2014 / 9:45PM 178 notes

jamesdean-withlove:

Fun Fact: During the bench scene in ‘Rebel without a Cause’  James Dean adlibbed his script in order to make a secret tribute to ex girlfriend Liz Sheridan. In the scene, Jim strokes Plato’s head in comfort after he confesses the truth about his father, although the camera is focused on Mineo, Jimmy is clearly heard saying “suuure. Suuuuuure.” Dizzy illustrates in her book that it was an expression used constantly between them, describing it as ‘our own little security blanket, cooing it to each other the way you would to a child’
"Do you love me?" 
"S-u-u-r-e"
"Are you hungry?" 
"S-u-u-r-e"
"Will you rub my back?"
"S-u-u-r-e"
In an extract of Dizzy and Jimmy, Liz Sheridan describes the first time she’d seen this scene working in a movie theatre in New York, after Jimmy’s death, and after prolonging seeing it for so long.
'Finally, one night after my first set, I walked into the back of the theatre. There were no empty seats; it was as crowded as it had been since it opened. So I stood in the corner and watched. There on the screen were Natalie Wood, Sal Mineo and Jimmy. Natalie whisper-sang a lullaby; Sal told them the story of his father. Jimmy reached over to stroke Sal's head, to comfort him…and then, suddenly, I heard him say it: “Suuuuure. Suuuuuuure.” The way he'd said it to me, the way I said it to him. There it was, a gift for me. I stood in the dark and began to cry.'

jamesdean-withlove:

Fun Fact: During the bench scene in ‘Rebel without a Cause’  James Dean adlibbed his script in order to make a secret tribute to ex girlfriend Liz Sheridan. In the scene, Jim strokes Plato’s head in comfort after he confesses the truth about his father, although the camera is focused on Mineo, Jimmy is clearly heard saying “suuure. Suuuuuure.” Dizzy illustrates in her book that it was an expression used constantly between them, describing it as ‘our own little security blanket, cooing it to each other the way you would to a child’

"Do you love me?" 

"S-u-u-r-e"

"Are you hungry?" 

"S-u-u-r-e"

"Will you rub my back?"

"S-u-u-r-e"

In an extract of Dizzy and Jimmy, Liz Sheridan describes the first time she’d seen this scene working in a movie theatre in New York, after Jimmy’s death, and after prolonging seeing it for so long.

'Finally, one night after my first set, I walked into the back of the theatre. There were no empty seats; it was as crowded as it had been since it opened. So I stood in the corner and watched. There on the screen were Natalie Wood, Sal Mineo and Jimmy. Natalie whisper-sang a lullaby; Sal told them the story of his father. Jimmy reached over to stroke Sal's head, to comfort him…and then, suddenly, I heard him say it: “Suuuuure. Suuuuuuure.” The way he'd said it to me, the way I said it to him. There it was, a gift for me. I stood in the dark and began to cry.'

(via jamesdeangirl)

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October 18, 2014 / 9:42PM 76 notes

(Source: batbrain-, via nostalgic-60s)

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October 18, 2014 / 12:33AM 4 notes

Sr Guitarra, ganándose la vida en Coyoacán. 

#mexico #df #coyoacán #guitar #guitarra #música #music #actor #luise #instagram

Sr Guitarra, ganándose la vida en Coyoacán.

#mexico #df #coyoacán #guitar #guitarra #música #music #actor #luise #instagram

músicainstagrammexicodfactorguitarcoyoacánmusicluiseguitarra

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October 18, 2014 / 12:29AM

OFF
THE
WALL

OFF
THE
WALL

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October 12, 2014 / 1:52PM 3,928 notes

(Source: beautyinfilms, via claptonism)

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October 11, 2014 / 2:18AM 1,995 notes


Sammy Davis, Jr. photographed by Bernie Abramson, c. 1955

Sammy Davis, Jr. photographed by Bernie Abramson, c. 1955

(Source: deforest, via mattybing1025)

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October 11, 2014 / 1:15AM 64 notes


Shirley MacLaine as Charity Hope Valentine in Sweet Charity, 1969. (dir. Bob Fosse)

Shirley MacLaine as Charity Hope Valentine in Sweet Charity, 1969. (dir. Bob Fosse)

(Source: indypendent-thinking, via 60sland)

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